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Commercial shoot in South Korea!

We're in the process of making a new commercial for the compression clothing company, enerskin. And we just shot the segment of it in South Korea. Big Thanks to amazing Korean athletes and enerskin team !  and Korean food... We miss it so much...

We had challenge to shoot high speed shots on location with less-big lights. So we tested the Phantom Flex4k using available lights at hotel. Starring SPIKE!!

BTS photo. FROG, world class break dancer based in Seoul.

BTS photo. FROG, world class break dancer based in Seoul.

 

 

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A Documentary Film Shoot in UGANDA!

Hey all, we just filmed a part of the documentary film directed by a very talented director, Jennifer Azano.

Back in this January, Jen went to Uganda for a month to teach filmmaking program at a local boarding school with her co-producer, Mike DiGiacinto. At the end of the program, Jen led students to make their own short film. The film that is written, acted and made by the 14-15yrs old Ugandan students who never learned screenwriting, filmmaking or acting before!

She came back to U.S. with the footage and edited over months. This time we went to film the premiere screening of the short film at a local movie theatre.

There were a lot of emotional/beautiful moments during our 8 days stay in Uganda. We did our best to capture them.

This project is not finished yet. Stay tune!

We stayed in school and saw this every night. There were barely any electricity, tap water or gas in the villages around the school.

We stayed in school and saw this every night. There were barely any electricity, tap water or gas in the villages around the school.

Every morning and dusk, local villagers come to a well in the school to get some water for their family at home. Then they walk back to a long steep and bumpy road to get home. Those containers filled with water were heavy. 

Every morning and dusk, local villagers come to a well in the school to get some water for their family at home. Then they walk back to a long steep and bumpy road to get home. Those containers filled with water were heavy. 

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Our New Drone Reel Is Up!

We've been using a DJI Inspire Drone for film, commercial and reality show projects.

It was not easy to fully understand the mechanics of it at the beginning. But we've been fortunate enough to travel for quite a few projects and fly our drone in many places, like the beautiful Hamptons, Nevada's wonderful red desert and the amazing coast lines of South Africa.

Lately, we upgraded our drone camera to Zenmuse X5 which can capture more crisp and detailed images with 4K micro four thirds sensor.

Please take a look!

  

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2nd Camera Arrived! RED SCARLET-W 5K.

We received a new RED SCARLET-W 5K Camera! This camera was just released in this February from RED. 

The camera can record up to 50fps at 5K full frame and 120fps at 4k full frame. Like RED DRAGON, it can simultaneously capture both R3D and Avid DNxHD or Apple ProRes file formats.

If you want to shoot your film, commercial or interview with 2 cameras, we cover it all!

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Camera Upgrade! RED WEAPON 6K.

We upgraded our RED Dragon to RED Weapon 6K!

The camera can record up to 75fps at 6K full frame and 120fps at 4K full frame. Also, it can simultaneously record RED CODE Raw and Apple ProRes or Avid DNxHD file formats-at the same time.

We just shot Axalta commercial with RED Weapon. and loving it!

Fresh out the box!

Fresh out the box!

Spike is rocking Weapon with Ronin.

Spike is rocking Weapon with Ronin.

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"The Lake on Clinton Road" feature film behind the scenes.

UrbanMouse went back to its roots with this one.  This was the epitome of bare bones, independent filmmaking.  Primarily, this feature film was produced, shot, and edited with only a 3 person crew + cast.  Despite these obstacles, the film is finished, has distribution and is playing in select theaters.  Find out how we made something out of virtually nothing.

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"Orange Bright" Short film cinematography

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"Orange Bright" Short film cinematography

I was approached by Riley Wilson of Imaginary Forces to shoot a short film he had written called "Orange Bright."  In this film, I experimented with a lot of flares, soft filters and the Sigma ART 35/1.8 zoom lens to support the non-linear, surreal story-telling style he employed.  Since I was handling the edit, I was able to approach the VFX shots very practically with low-tech, low-cost solutions.  Read more about it here.

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"Memoir" Hits the Festival Circuit

A Fashion Film that we made a couple month ago, "Memoir" has been chosen as Official Selection for the Miami Fashion Film Festival and La Jolla Fashion Film Festival 2014.

La Jolla International Fashion Film Festival is scheduled from July 24, 2014 to July 26, 2014.

Miami Fashion Film Festival is scheduled from September 10, 2014 to September 14, 2014.

We're planning to be there for the screening so please come by and say hi to us if you will be around there! 

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Fashion Film - Memoir

One of our models, Alexandra Chelaru. (still from the film)

Hi Everyone,

My name is Motomu Ishigaki from the UrbanMouse production team.  Recently, created a fashion film for an inspiring, upcoming women’s clothing brand, District Lane.

We wrote, directed, produced, shot and edited all in-house, and I'd like to share the process of making the film here.

CONCEPT

During preproduction, District Lane gave us following ideas, input, and requests:

  1. Inspiration of their Fall/Winter '14 collection comes from the designer’s own childhood memory.  Therefore, the wardrobe is 80’s vintage inspired.  
  2. They would like to film models in a snowy forest as well as a vintage-looking home.
  3. They’d like to use a narrative short film as their vehicle, but without losing the elements of a fashion video.  Without being too direct, the film needs to showcase each dress.
  4. The goal of this project was to compound our resources, and incorporate a look book photo shoot as well as the video shoot on the same day, somewhat simultaneously.

Location Scout Photo 1

I proposed a treatment where we can film the video and photo in one day within two locations. One was an urban industrial subway tunnel in NYC.  The other was a vintage-looking house surrounded by forest in Ulster Park, NY (upstate).  Based on the designer’s inspiration, I wrote a script that told the story visually from a little girl's perspective. 

Location scout photo 2

CASTING

During auditions, it was wonderful to meet three models/actresses, Kathryn Ramirez, Alexandra Chelaru, and Marjorie Simionato. They did have not only great looks for the collection, but they also possessed the ability to bring emotion to the story.  District Lane really liked their subtle and sincere performance.

SHOOTING

On the shoot day, the Ulster Park location was covered with up to 30 inches of snow and it kept snowing throughout the day!  While we wanted to have snow, it was WAY more than we needed!  Even though one of our awesome crew members, went to the location and shoveled snow down the long driveway the day before the shoot, a 12-passenger van couldn't drive up to the house, and many of us had to hike 200-300ft in the deep snow.  Fortunately, we had efficient shooting plan with our great collaborator/still photographer, Shumma Nakatani,  enabling us to shoot everything that we wanted.

Last but not least, I was very fortunate to incorporate music from a great composer, Danny Bensi. 

We hope you enjoy our fashion film "Memoir," and big thanks to District Lane!

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Wyclef Jean Double Feature

A few months ago we were approached by G-Carma Inc. with two music video productions for Wyclef Jean for songs from his latest album, "April Showers." These productions varied from a bigger production on studio/sound stage in Miami to a more modest production on-location in NYC.  

Despite moderate budgets we employed our usual practical approach to filmmaking and cinematography to provide our clients with the best bang for buck.  Some notable approaches to minimize careless spending was to create our own rain machine with help from a talented handy man named Luis, to affordable aerial shots by way of going handheld with an EPIC on NYC heli tour.  We also opted not to hire a steadicam operator and I flew the epic ourselves on our rig (look at the complexity of the shot.  I aint no slouch!). This enabled the production to spend more efficiently on areas that that were crucial to the music videos' concepts.  We like being team players and we love the results.

My company, UrbanMouse, which is really comprised of me, Spike, and that random Japanese dude in all our pictures, Motomu... we handled most production aspects, directing (co), vfx, cinematography, editing (for Hard Times).  Our main editor for MLC was my girlfriend, Wen Hsuan Tseng.  Keep it in the family! S/O to Marco and Florida Film House team, Mastershot films and Margaret Matthews for playing integral roles in production.

This is shaping up to be the summer of music videos.  We have another big and exciting music video currently in the works.  Can't wait to share it with the five people that look at this blog.  In the meantime, have a look-see.

DIY Rain Machine... $25

Raining Bird's Eye Shot... priceless (actually still 25 bucks + Marco's water bill.)

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The Golden Scallop world premiere

One and a half years ago I was hired by Grandview Productions to DP a film called, The Golden Scallop.  It's remained to be one of the best feature film sets I've worked on and has turned out to be one of the best features I've shot to date.  The team at GVP were true professionals, logistically on-point, and creatively empowering.  

What I found most interesting about shooting this film was the fact that it is a mocumentary.  Typically, this style of shooting isn't indicative of my body of work, but after speaking with director, Joe Laraja, it was clear that he wanted the look to teeter on the edge where documentary meets classic narrative.  Even when we were shooting docu style, we sometimes mixed it with more cinematic style lighting/framing.  Joe and I spent much time discussing the cut and how scenes can blend from comedic, docu-style shooting with zooms and minimal cutting to classic narrative style shooting that employs shot-reverse-shot and even a dolly or two.  This process was creatively challenging and a whole lot of fun to explore.

Fast forward to this week, I'm happy to share on its world premiere at the Newport Beach Film Festival in CA, The Golden Scallop has been awarded for Outstanding Achievement in Filmmaking.  TGS receives this award amongst an impressive lineup of films.  Newport Beach Film Festival is famous for premiering/presenting such films as Crash and 500 days of Summer.  Needless to say, myself and the team at GVP are excited for the launch of its festival run.  Below is a pic of the GVP teams Q&A following the 1st screening at NBFF.  

You can watch the trailer here: https://vimeo.com/48929240. It was cut before color correction/grading but it's still a fun trailer and the actual feature looks great.  I couldnt be happier with the end result.  I encourage you to go see it if its screened in your city.  

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Interactive Media

We recently shot a promotional campaign for our friends over at Source-Marketing.  Their client was BIC and they were launching an Ad campaign for their product, BiC Hybrid Advance 4 razors. This razor is a hybrid because it weilds properties of non-disposable, interchangeable head razors but is still disposable, including the handle.  SM's concept was to create interactive video website where a quirky character named Danbob would invite the user to use his "Hybrid Collider" machine to make hybrid creations of their own.  Basically, at the end of the 1st video, the user will be granted the ability to key in any text onto the hybrid collider's user interface.  Based on what you enter, one of MANY videos we shot will play showing different results.

We shot this on RED ONE-MX and it actually looked very nice, but the client ended opting for a low-fi, DIY video look so there is obvious, intentional image degradation. 

Was a unique shoot and people seem to be having fun with it online.  Youtube comments show some really interesting entries such as "Chris Brown" and "Rihanna."  Why not give it a shot at http://www.youtube.com/BICHybridExperience

If you enter in "SUSHI" and "HIPHOP" you might get to see my multitalented AC, Motomu Ishigaki gettin gangsta as a hype-man for rapper Danbob.

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One Crazy Music Video

Background- Last year, we were referred to by a friend of UrbanMouse (Thanks Sheldon!).  The client was a hip-hop artist named Gliffics.  He was a very enthusiastic artist, adamant about the level and quality he desired for his single, "Call Me Crazy."

To achieve this, Gliffics was willing to generate a budget for those production expenses that many indie clients overlook, such as set design, props, wardrobe, etc... Dont get me wrong, the CMC budget was still somewhat limited in terms of what could fund our creativity.  This meant that we would not be able to afford to hire much of a crew due the amount of materials we had to buy.  In other words, Spike and I would be handling most things from prepro to post.  That said, we needed to come up with a concept/treatment that would fit the bill.  I view this as a somewhat formulaic process: Concept x Cost = Budget.  Now I'm not very good at math, but with this equation it's easy.  If we know that the budget and cost values are fixed, then the only variable that we can change to make this formula work, is the concept.   In a perfect world, we could solve for budget as the variable.  This isn't a new approach for experienced producers, but I find putting it in these terms makes it simple mathematics, not opinion. 

Concept- After much discussion during a road trip with Spike, I came to the conclusion that a Dexter-themed video could work and make sense economically.  For one thing, DEXTER is current.  There is already an established story, so by parodying it, we avoid having to establish/support the storyline.  We can simply rely on visuals to support thematically.  It's simple. Dexter kills bad people; Gliffics kills bad rappers.  Moreover, after doing some research, I found the DEXTER materials to be pretty cost efficient with a lot of bang for buck.  For example, covering a room in plastic really is easy/cheap set design.  One industrial 2000ft role of saran wrap is simple wardrobe/costume for a victim as well as added set design.  Tyvek suits, latex/rubber gloves, plastic face guards, and the like all proved to be relatively cheap purchases.  A trip to Home Depot and the Restaurant Depot and we were set.

Locations- Where can you find lots of empty space that will let you create a giant puddle using 120 gallons of fake blood?  Though our client secured the music studio location, we couldnt leave the "blood scene" location up to him.  Because we knew exactly the level of mess we wanted to create, we needed to be absolutely sure the location owner understood what we would be doing and not change their mind later claiming it wasnt explained clearly.  It felt too risky to leave this up to anyone else so Spike reached out to a friend of UrbanMouse, Gfella.  He hooked it up with a warehouse that we practically had free reign in.  Thanks again, G!  Using one of OUR favors for a client, free of charge.  Just another example of UM customer service! (shameless plug over).

Blood- This is where most of the production funds went.  I think Spike is now an expert mixologist for various types of fake blood.  After much research and experimenting, we found that creating good-looking blood is easy with the right materials, particularly corn syrup.  However, how do you make 20 gallons of quality, fake blood without blowing the budget?  Have you ever seen a bottle of corn syrup at the grocery store larger than 16 oz?  Even more difficult is how do you make another 110 gallons of fake blood without the expense of corn syrup?  As I said earlier, Restaurant Depot really saved us by allowing us to buy in bulk.  For example, they sold corn syrup in 4 gallon cases!  For the less important 110 gallons of blood, we bought rasberry red jello cases, corn starch and red/blue food coloring, all in bulk.  We mixed them in drum barrels (see pic to the left - Thanks Melissa!)  Restaurant Depot is the truth, and I wish I could shop there for my regular grocery needs!  You need to be a member to shop there and that usually means you own a restaurant.  Our access was from another favor from another UrbanMouse friend (Thanks Jam!) saving our client hundreds!  Ok, that was the last one, seriously.

 

 

Cinematography- I guess I should mention something about this since I claim to be a DP.  We shot using our trusty Zeiss ZF lenses.  However, I would say a third of the project or more was shot with the Tokina 11-16.  It proved to be a "Crazy" lens for this music video.  Shot on our EPIC-X.  The size and mobility of the EPIC helped us set up quickly and get all our shots done in two days.  Because the production wasn't so smooth, (e.g. no AD, no line producer, missing actors, ppl not showing up on time) we needed to shoot fast when we were actually shooting.  Also, the variable frame rate options on the EPIC played a big role.  We overcranked quite a few shots at 5k 120fps during the blood scenes - god i hated 2k 120fps on RED ONE.  The stop motion-ish look was achieved at 12fps at a 1/96 shutter.  We knew we wanted to employ some kind of motion effect to add to the craze of this piece.  At first, I thought a slower shutter speed with lots of motion blur would be desired, but after scripting the treatment, I felt that a hard, crisp, edginess of a faster shutter would better compliment the blood and grit of the theme, and that it would contrast well with the humor and ridiculous acting that we would get out of gliff, lenny and the gang.  To determine what shutter speed I found most preferrable, I did a little camera test with the opening hook, featuring my girlfriend, as my hype-man!  This video may be better than the actual "Call Me Crazy" video but what do you expect with such amazing talent on screen?

For the plastic room in verse one, I only used the one 250w edison bulb.  I promised my go-to gaffer, Tom Chaves that I would make up some elaborate schematic of how we achieved lighting in verse 1, but I dont really want him to get any work besides through UrbanMouse, so yeah, just one edison bulb.  We simply hung it low enough to cast shadows with Gliffics body.  We also kept it swinging to make it a bit more dynamic, throwing shadows all around.  The plastic that we hung up was pretty thick at 4 mil.  It bounced a decent amount of fill from all sides which made the single light approach work.  Especially since the artist wanted to wear a baseball cap, bill forward.

Post Production- I knew I wanted to keep the rhythm of the shots/cuts at a fast pace.  BPM's on this track are pretty high so I wanted to keep the visual energy as stimulating as the music.  Because we scheduled an adequate amount of shooting time (2 days), we were able to get all the footage we needed.  Therefore, I was in a good place in the edit room when assembling the scenes/verses together.  At times, I actually had a hard time fiiting in shots that were deemed "must use."  This was a great problem to have because it forced me to judge shots with much more scrutiny.  Also having a good amount of footage ensured that I could cut rapidly without running out of ammunition and having to repeat shots.  Clients often opt for 1 day of shooting because it will cost less, but it more than pays for itself to schedule accordingly, and if you cant afford adequate shooting time, I'd say go back to the formula above and solve for concept again.

Spike handled all the AE workload.  He used Twixtor on the 120fps "Blood Splash" footage to get it slowed down to roughly 4% of its already 5x slow motion speed.  For these shots, we set the camera's shutter speed to 1/2000sec to minimize blur in anticipation of using Twixtor.  It's not perfect.  You can still see some morphing, but this is difficult to avoid given the speed and unpredictable shape a splash makes. Additional blood was added in post for the "sawing" shot.  Optical flares had to be tracked manually because the the 12fps footage couldnt be tracked using the software.  We worked in tandem remotely, as he would send 5k TGA and 1080 PNG's with alpha over our dropbox account.  I used QT to interpret then brought into FCP.

From a Directing standpoint, I was very happy that to see the idea/concept & previsualization come to life, as planned, in the edit room.  Often times, you think of an idea and even though you plan and shoot-for-the-edit, what you end up from the shoot prompts you to change your plan in the edit room and you end up with something slightly different.  Not saying this is always bad.  In fact, sometimes it ends up being a plus as opposed to a compromise.  However, in the case of CMC, it really came to life on screen the way I imagined it could.  If somehow, youre still with me, thank you for reading, and without further blog nonsense, enjoy the video. 

To hear more from Gliffics, visit Gliffics.com.  His debut album "Against All Odds" is available on  iTunes. 

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